Category: Criminal law

Amendments to the Films Act: Problems and Concerns

Media recording prohibition sign

A sign indicating that media recording is prohibited. (By Juhele [CC0], via the Wikimedia Commons.)

Dr Kevin Y L Tan
Professor, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies
Nanyang Technological University
Professor (Adjunct), Faculty of Law
National University of Singapore

Dr Ang Peng Hwa
Professor
Wee Kim Wee School of Information & Communications
Nanyang Technological University

Introduction

The Films Act (Cap 107) was enacted to regulate the “possession, importation, making, distribution and exhibition of films”. The Government now proposes to pass the Films (Amendment) Act, which is the subject of this representation. We have major concerns on the following fronts: Continue reading

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Conference announcement: The 6th Asian Constitutional Law Forum

Greetings!

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) invites you to The 6th Asian Constitutional Law Forum: Constitutionalism in the Courts: Judicial Review and the Separation of Powers in Asia, to be held at Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore, on 10 and 11 December 2015.

The Asian Constitutional Law Forum provides a venue for distinguished scholars and new scholars to share their research and ideas on Asian constitutional law, to expand collaborative research networks, and to facilitate publications. Continue reading

Conference announcement: The Life and Future of British Colonial Sexual Regulation in Asia

Greetings!

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) invites you to the conference, The Life and Future of British Colonial Sexual Regulation in Asia, organised by Lynette J. Chua (NUS) and Michael Hor (Hong Kong University), to be held at the Moot Court, Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore, on 8–9 October 2015. Continue reading

Conference announcement: SMU Criminal Justice Conference 2015

SMU Criminal Justice Conference 2015

When should a police officer be allowed to detain you?
When you are detained, should you be allowed to consult a lawyer immediately?
Are you always presumed innocent until proven guilty?
When you are eventually convicted, should the state be allowed to punish you any way it deems fit?

Most importantly, how does the Constitution respond to these issues?

These issues (and more) will be explored by a panel of eminent speakers at the SMU Criminal Justice Conference 2015, organized by the SMU Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice Club. Continue reading

Hopeful Steps on Harassment

By Vassil (CC-BY-3.0), from the Wikimedia Commons

Dr Jack Tsen-Ta Lee
Assistant Professor of Law
School of Law, SMU

THERE IS MUCH to like about the Protection from Harassment Bill[1] that was introduced into Parliament on 3 March 2014.

First, it performs a housekeeping task by consolidating criminal offences relating to harassment into a single Act of Parliament. Thus, sections 13A to 13D of the Miscellaneous Offences (Public Order and Nuisance) Act[2] will be repealed and re-enacted in modified forms in the new Act. The maximum penalties will be enhanced – intentionally causing harassment, alarm or distress to someone can currently be punished with a fine of up to $5,000, but in future a District Court will also be able to impose a jail term of up to six months in appropriate cases.[3] Continue reading