Category: Criminal justice

The Limits of Prosecutorial Discretion

Attorney-General's Chambers, Singapore

The Attorney-General’s Chambers, Singapore. (By Sgconlaw, CC BY-SA 3.0, via the Wikimedia Commons.)

Marcus Teo
Fourth-year LLB student
Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore

IN A RECENT opinion piece published in The Straits Times,[1] Professor Walter Woon examined the role and functions of the Attorney-General (“AG”) and argued that the AG’s independence should be strengthened, among other ways, by separating the AG’s current function as a legal advisor to the government from his prosecutorial function. With respect to the latter, Professor Woon reminds us that decisions to prosecute or not involve a “judgment call”, and that “[t]here are many reasons why a decision may be taken not to prosecute.” However, such decisions have serious consequences for accused persons, victims of crimes, and the public. Continue reading

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Conference announcement: The 6th Asian Constitutional Law Forum

Greetings!

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) invites you to The 6th Asian Constitutional Law Forum: Constitutionalism in the Courts: Judicial Review and the Separation of Powers in Asia, to be held at Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore, on 10 and 11 December 2015.

The Asian Constitutional Law Forum provides a venue for distinguished scholars and new scholars to share their research and ideas on Asian constitutional law, to expand collaborative research networks, and to facilitate publications. Continue reading

Conference announcement: The Life and Future of British Colonial Sexual Regulation in Asia

Greetings!

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) invites you to the conference, The Life and Future of British Colonial Sexual Regulation in Asia, organised by Lynette J. Chua (NUS) and Michael Hor (Hong Kong University), to be held at the Moot Court, Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore, on 8–9 October 2015. Continue reading

Conference announcement: SMU Criminal Justice Conference 2015

SMU Criminal Justice Conference 2015

When should a police officer be allowed to detain you?
When you are detained, should you be allowed to consult a lawyer immediately?
Are you always presumed innocent until proven guilty?
When you are eventually convicted, should the state be allowed to punish you any way it deems fit?

Most importantly, how does the Constitution respond to these issues?

These issues (and more) will be explored by a panel of eminent speakers at the SMU Criminal Justice Conference 2015, organized by the SMU Constitutional Law and Criminal Justice Club. Continue reading