Towards a “Thin” Basic Structure Doctrine in Singapore (I-CONnect Column) by Jaclyn L. Neo

http://www.iconnectblog.com/2018/01/towards-a-thin-basic-structure-doctrine-in-singapore-i-connect-column/

Advertisements

CfP: 2018 Annual Conference of the International Society of Public Law (“ICON-S”)

The 2018 Annual Conference of the International Society of Public Law (“ICON-S”) will take place at the University of Hong Kong on June 25-27, 2018, under the auspices of the University of Hong Kong’s Faculty of Law and its Centre for Comparative and Public Law. This will be the fifth Annual Conference of ICON-S, following its four Annual Conferences (Florence 2014, New York 2015, Berlin 2016, Copenhagen 2017), and will be the first time the conference is held in Asia. The event will mark the beginning of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Faculty of Law of the University of Hong Kong.

The theme of the conference is “Identity, Security, Democracy: Challenges for Public Law”.

ICON-S currently has 1,200 members. It is a leading global forum for public law discourse. Its annual conferences have attracted hundreds of participants globally, including distinguished scholars, jurists and policy-makers, younger researchers and graduate students, in all areas of public law – including administrative law, constitutional law, international law, criminal law, immigration and citizenship law and human rights. The upcoming event in Hong Kong is expected to attract hundreds of public lawyers worldwide. The conference will include a keynote address by The Rt Hon the Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury, former President of the Supreme Court of the UK (2012-2017), as well as three plenary sessions on “Diversity, Identity and Human Rights”, “Courts and Democratization”, and “Technology and Public Law”, respectively. The tentative plenary programme can be found here.

The conference organizers are now calling for papers to be presented at the conference’s parallel sessions, the heart of the event. If you are interested in submitting an abstract for the conference, please note the following:

  • The due date for submission of abstracts is 31 January 2018.
  • The language of the conference is English.
  • Your presentation may relate to any aspect of public law, and need not be limited to the general theme of the conference.
  • Proposals for fully-formed panels are strongly encouraged, although individual papers are also acceptable. Panel proposals should include at least three papers by scholars who have agreed in advance to participate. Such fully-formed panel proposals should also identify one or two discussants, who may also serve as panel chair and/or paper presenter. Each concurrent session is 90 minutes. A panel proposal should include the name of the chair and/or discussant, the names of the presenters, the abstracts of each presentation, and a title and brief description of the topic of the panel.
  • Submission of full papers is not required for the purpose of participating in this conference.
  • To submit abstracts, please follow the procedures here. In order to participate in the conference, you must register as a member of ICON-S. The membership fee covers the conference registration fee. It is US$50 for non-OECD jurisdictions and US$95 for OECD

 

 

 

Constitutional Change in Singapore’s Elected Presidency: Navigating Questions of Ethnic Identity and Representation

Blog of the IACL, AIDC

By Dr Jaclyn L. Neo

Jaclyn Neo - Headshot

For the first time since its independence in 1965, Singapore has a female President. Madam Halimah Yaacob was sworn in as the country’s 8th President on 14 September 2017. She is also Singapore’s first Malay President since the presidency was changed from a nominated office to an elected one in 1991.

Several constitutional changes led up to Madam Halimah’s election. The first took place in 1991, when the Presidency was changed to an elected office. This change was justified on the grounds that the President needed a democratic mandate to wield additional constitutional powers. Under the British Westminster parliamentary system, after which Singapore’s political system is modelled, the head of state is mostly a ceremonial position. Accordingly, Singapore’s President only had limited discretionary powers, i.e. over the appointment of the Prime Minister, declaring the office of the Prime Minister vacant, and refusing a request…

View original post 1,284 more words

Amendments to the Films Act: Problems and Concerns

Media recording prohibition sign

A sign indicating that media recording is prohibited. (By Juhele [CC0], via the Wikimedia Commons.)

Dr Kevin Y L Tan
Professor, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies
Nanyang Technological University
Professor (Adjunct), Faculty of Law
National University of Singapore

Dr Ang Peng Hwa
Professor
Wee Kim Wee School of Information & Communications
Nanyang Technological University

Introduction

The Films Act (Cap 107) was enacted to regulate the “possession, importation, making, distribution and exhibition of films”. The Government now proposes to pass the Films (Amendment) Act, which is the subject of this representation. We have major concerns on the following fronts: Continue reading

The Limits of Prosecutorial Discretion

Attorney-General's Chambers, Singapore

The Attorney-General’s Chambers, Singapore. (By Sgconlaw, CC BY-SA 3.0, via the Wikimedia Commons.)

Marcus Teo
Fourth-year LLB student
Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore

IN A RECENT opinion piece published in The Straits Times,[1] Professor Walter Woon examined the role and functions of the Attorney-General (“AG”) and argued that the AG’s independence should be strengthened, among other ways, by separating the AG’s current function as a legal advisor to the government from his prosecutorial function. With respect to the latter, Professor Woon reminds us that decisions to prosecute or not involve a “judgment call”, and that “[t]here are many reasons why a decision may be taken not to prosecute.” However, such decisions have serious consequences for accused persons, victims of crimes, and the public. Continue reading

Tan Cheng Bock’s Constitutional Challenge: Who is the First Elected President?

Dr Tan Cheng Bock at the nomination centre during the 2011 presidential election, 17 August 2011

Dr Tan Cheng Bock at the nomination centre during the 2011 presidential election on 17 August 2011. (By Tdxiang (Tan Ding Xiang) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via the Wikimedia Commons.)

Samuel Ling
LLB (National University of Singapore) (2017)
Guest student contributor

In May, Dr Tan Cheng Bock filed an application to determine, among other things, how the hiatus-triggered reserved election would be administered. His application was dismissed by the High Court on 7 July 2017. As Dr Tan’s appeal heads to the Court of Appeal this Monday (31 July), this post discusses his primary challenge to constitutional reforms. Continue reading

New Blog on Administrative Law in the Common Law World: the Admin Law Blog

Readers of the Singapore Public Law Blog may be interested in the newly launched Admin Law Blog.  The Admin Law Blog is a forum for the discussion of ideas and developments of interest to scholars of administrative law across the common law world. It aims to connect administrative law scholars to each other and to contribute to the growing field of comparative administrative law. The blog is edited by Farrah Ahmed (Melbourne Law School), Swati Jhaveri (National University of Singapore), and Adam Perry (University of Oxford).

It will serve as an incubation site for scholarly projects and legal reform proposals. It will feature both analysis pieces as well as a regular ‘roundup’ of developments in the field.  The blog has been launched with a topical post by Susan Rose-Ackerman on ‘Administrative Law, the Common Law and the US Presidential System’ comparing separation of powers and checks and balances in the US to other common law parliamentary democracies. Paul Daly’s post next week on ‘Voidness, Voidability and Values‘ offers an account of the distinction between unlawful decisions that are void and those that are voidable.

Submissions to the blog are welcome at alawblogorg@gmail.com. You can also follow the blog on Twitter at @adminlawblog.